Tag: wonder woman

The Christmas Chronicles Was Netflix’s Most Watched Film in the US in 2020 and Other Data Thoughts from “Who Won December”

December was a big battle in the streaming wars. The Christmas Day/end of year is becoming increasingly important to the streamers since it is the last time to grab subscribers before annual reporting. This is why the latest installment of my “Who Won the Month” series at Decider may be the most important one of 2020. 

So check it out!

To keep that article flowing, I ended up cutting a few insights/thoughts from that article that still felt good enough to share. Consider this the “DVD extras” addendum to that great piece. (Seriously, read it before you continue.) 

Other Contenders That I Didn’t Mention

The biggest drawback to a word count is having to cut a few shows from contention. Last month that mainly meant some shows from the smaller streamers. CBS All-Access released their latest Stephen King thriller The Stand. (It had a peak of 9 on Google Trends.) The challenge is a word like “stand” is fairly generic, so it just may not be picked up in the Google Trends data. However, on IMDb, its ratings are 6,600, so likely it isn’t really catching on. Showtime released Your Honor, but it didn’t really budge the popularity needle.

Apple TV+ focused on kids in the holidays, airing both A Charlie Brown Christmas and Wolfwalkers. Again, I didn’t really see the Wolfwalkers trending. (Charlie Brown is too generic.)

Caveats to IMDb Data

For the first time, I compared shows using IMDb ratings data. I both want to explain how and why I used this data source and also some other insights into last month’s results.

The “why” is because I love capturing qualitative feedback on a given show or film in addition to viewership. In particular for TV, this can be somewhat of a leading indicator to forecast if subsequent seasons of a show are going to build momentum or begin to flag. This applies to TV series as well as film franchises. Especially for franchises, actually. A big marketing campaign can result in a strong opening weekend, but if the IMDb ratings are low, then eventually the series will decay in viewership. (See Fantastic Beasts or The Hobbit series for some examples.)

As for how, I tend to use both the rating itself and the number of ratings. The number of ratings is fairly correlated with viewership overall. Thus, if you don’t have viewership itself, IMDb can act as a proxy, like Google Trends. The actual rating itself (the 1-10 numbers) doesn’t account for small but well-liked films and TV series. My approach is to make a scatter plot, and see which films are in the upper right: lots of reviews and high ratings. (If you want to pay for it—and I can’t afford it—IMDb page traffic is also a good proxy.)

Now the caveat: some folks hate using IMDb ratings because online trolls have attacked certain films.

You can see this in Wonder Woman 1984. While it has nearly as many ratings as Soul, its average rating is much, much lower. Which raises the question of whether or not Wonder Woman 1984 is being intentionally dragged by trolls online. And this is the main problem with IMDb data: some folks will intentionally drag down shows for political reasons, which skew the value of this data source. 

But I won’t throw the baby out with the bath water. Because it’s the best publicly available, qualitative data set we have.

Rotten Tomatoes and Metacritic are probably the next two biggest review sites, and their numbers are orders of magnitude smaller than IMDb. The caveat here, of course, is that larger sample sizes of biased data are still biased, meaning that doesn’t justify using IMDb. The problem is that for Rotten Tomatoes and Metacritic, their sample sizes in many cases aren’t big enough to be representative. I’ve considered using Amazon ratings, but in that case some films are available in streaming, but some are available for free and some are available for purchase. This makes ratings not apples-to-apples, and that’s before the fraud problem with Amazon ratings.  

So when I use IMDb data, I tend to accept its shortcomings and use it carefully. To start, I know IMDb tends to skew “genre” in its ratings. This means for shows like The Expanse or Wonder Woman 1984, I’d say the reviews on IMDb are relevant. Since The Expanse has done well on IMDb, that shows some genuine fan interest. For something like Bridgerton, I’m less concerned if its score is weak.

Then, I try to figure out if a given show has been dragged by potential online trolls. When they have—eg The Last Jedi, Black Panther or Captain Marvel—I just wouldn’t use those ratings. Though don’t go overboard: don’t pretend that every poorly rated film is just a victim of online trolls. Some films are bad and fans don’t like them.

For Wonder Woman 1984 specifically, while I haven’t heard of any specific campaigns, on another user review site, Rotten Tomatoes, Wonder Woman 1984 has done better than its IMDb score. This likely indicates there is some intentional downvoting, but even with that it is unlikely Wonder Woman would have been a 8.0 or higher film.

IMAGE 1 - RT vs IMDb for Wonder Woman

A score of an “8” on IMDb tends to separate the merely good from the great. Meanwhile, The Midnight Sky did poorly in both locations. So it may be widely watched, but folks didn’t really love it.

(Also, never use the Tomatometer. That has very little nuance since it simply measures “good vs bad”.)

Did Netflix Have a Good December?

Probably, but not as good as last year. If you just casually read the news, you heard a series of great Netflix reports, and you’d assume they’re crushing it again.

Fortunately, I’ve collected every Netflix datecdote over the last few years and can put those numbers in context. Here’s the last three December releases that we have datecdotes for from Netflix. (These are films released in December. I’ll look at Netflix’s entire Q4 in a future article.)

IMAGE 2 - NFLX Decembers

The best way to describe this is that Netflix’s top film and top TV show released in December both underperformed their peers who launched last year. This looks even worse in context of the growth of the service during that time frame. The key question every quarter is whether Netflix’s content can help propel growth, or merely hold subscriber counts steady. And it seems to me like Netflix held steady in December compared to 2019.

Did Disney Really Win the Month?

For the first time in December, I didn’t just declare The Mandalorian as the winner in December, I also said that Disney won the month compared to Netflix. Essentially, between Soul and The Mandalorian, Netflix didn’t have a blockbuster show that drove the same level of interest.

The counter could be: but what if you added up every new thing Netflix released? Would it pass Disney by sheer volume?

So I looked for any Netflix series that seemed to generate interest and tried to figure that out. However, even after that, Disney was still the winner:

IMAGE 3 - Google Trends Expanded Look

There is a lesson in here about content planning and “return on investment”. Essentially, Disney could match Netflix for interest with only two hit releases. Now, those two may not generate as much time on the platform as Netflix currently has (their usage is much higher), but as for keeping subscribers, Disney may be able to do that more efficiently. I say “may” because it’s not like the two pieces of content Disney made are cheap by any means. (The Mandalorian may be the most expensive show on TV until Lord of the Rings comes out.) That’s its own form of inefficiency.

This also repeats a point I constantly make about the streaming wars: the best shows aren’t a little better than other shows, but multiples better. Thus, you don’t win the streaming wars with singles and doubles, but grand slams. And in July, November and December, Disney hit a grand slam each month. And with much fewer at bats than Netflix. That is an efficient form of content spend.

November Flashback: What Can Nielsen’s Data Tell Us?

The one drawback to my “Who Won the Month” series is that Nielsen data usually isn’t ready by the time I write my initial article. (They perform better near the month they cover, so I try to write them for the last day of the month or so.) This means that we can now look back and see which calls I made in December are either confirmed or refuted by the Nielsen data. 

So let’s hold myself accountable for my calls:

– Was The Mandalorian bigger than The Queen’s Gambit? I said yes, but according to Nielsen it depends how you count. The Queen’s Gambit was able to sustain higher week to week viewing than The Mandalorian, but Mando outpaced in terms of weeks on the Nielsen top ten:

IMAGE 4 - Week by Week Nielsen Ratings

– So The Crown was big? Yeah, that’s what the Nielsen data says. However, this is partly expected because The Crown now has four seasons airing, so that’s a lot of episodes to catch up on. The limitation of Nielsen’s data is we can’t see season level viewership. (That’s right, they give us some data and I just want more!)

– Did I undersell The Christmas Chronicles? Maybe. According to Nielsen’s data through the beginning of April, The Christmas Chronicles 2 had Netflix’s biggest film launch of this year in the United States by minutes viewed through the first two weeks! (36 million hours to Extraction’s 31.6 million hours in the first two weeks.)

– Did Hulu overhype Run? I think so. Hulu went so far as to release a vague press release calling Run its best performing film launch of all time. The problem for my system is that “run” is so vague that it didn’t register on Google Trends. So I said we’d wait for the Nielsen data to make a final call. When Nielsen released its weekly ratings for Thanksgiving weekend, Run didn’t make the cut.

Nielsen 2020.11.23 copy

– What about The Flight Attendant? At first, I was tempted to say that this HBO Max drama underperformed as well, because it didn’t make the Nielsen Top Ten. Then folks on Twitter (helpfully) pointed out that Nielsen isn’t tracking HBO Max yet. So we don’t know. Though, given that they only track services with a significant volume of regular viewers, likely The Flight Attendant wouldn’t have made the Nielsen top ten either.

My Favorite Ratings Tweet of the Quarter

This comes from Michael Mulvihill, who analyzes ratings for Fox Sports:

I would add, while he’s comparing 60 Minutes viewership to The Queen’s Gambit viewing, but that’s US only numbers compared to Netflix’s global viewership.  (Correction: I initially wrote NFL instead of 60 Minutes. As I’m supposed to say, I regret the error.)

Most Important Story of the Week – 25 Sep 20: We’re Heading for the (Almost) Worst Case Scenario For Theaters

Last week was a big one for me as I tore through a lot of Mulan data to produce my soon-to-be-biggest article of all time, “1.2 million Folks Bought Mulan on Disney+”. (It looks like it will dethrone the previous champion, “Netflix is a Broadcast Channel”.)

It’s been four weeks since I checked in on the health of theaters, let’s make that the most important story of the week.

Most Important Story of the Week – We’re Heading for the (Almost) Worst Case Scenario For Theaters

I try to think about things probabilistically. As Nate Silver would recommend. The world has lots of randomness, so events and different outcomes have different probabilities.

When I made my forecast of Coronavirus’s impact on theaters for a consulting client, I had a median case of theaters reopening in August. And it almost happened, but for a summer surge in cases. The worst case was that theaters would stay closed through 2020. We’re not quite to that worst case, but we’re close.

We’re partially opened in America as 70% of theaters are allowed to be open, but the studios are pulling their tent poles until the biggest markets reopen. Given that the US still accounts for 30-50% of a film’s total box office, America’s uncertain situation is scaring off all the big studio releases.

Which is a shame, because the rest of the world is doing much better. They’ve opened and after a few weeks most customers returned. Yet the US uncertainty (combined with global piracy, which is another shame) has held all the big studios from releasing their true tentpoles. The news of the last few weeks is that studios waited to see what Tenet would do, and found it wanting. 

Thus, Wonder Woman: 1984 moved to the end of the year (Christmas Day) and Black Widow moved to 2021. Though not all of Disney’s slate, as Soul is still holding onto Thanksgiving. And Universal moved up a few kids films to try their new PVOD strategy.

So I wouldn’t say we’re in the darkest timeline for theaters, but we’re closing in on it. November and December will have a lot of weight to pull to bring studios and theaters through.

Other Contender for Story of the Week – The Tik Tok Deal and Global Entertainment

Every newsletter I follow has been tracking the ins-and-outs of this story. But I waited. Would it be Microsoft? Or Oracle? Or Walmart? Or none of the above?Twists, turns and…we’ve ended up in almost the exact same place?

It’s like that quote from the Red Queen: you can run all day and end up in the exact same place. (Hat tip to the The Lost World novel for writing about that and logging it in my head from (is this right?) 25 years ago.)

All that has really changed is that Byte Dance has a new 20% owner of Tik Tok (Oracle) and it gets to keep operating in the United States. But it keeps its algorithm and presumably spy software in China.

Does this have implications from global entertainment? Assuredly, though let’s not go too far.

Clearly, China and America are headed for a new “Cold War” or “Bipolar” economic landscape. I’m not breaking news telling you that. President Trump has also escalated the situation with his proposed bans on TikTok and WeChat.

Not that this economic nationalism is unprecedented. China has banned US apps and companies for years. The biggest challenge for both EU and US companies and their nation-state champions is that there really is an unfairness in the global business situation. Netflix, Amazon, Google and others can’t operate in China due to protection laws. Yet, the EU and USA (and most OECD nations) pride themselves on allowing free and open markets. Which lets in Chinese champions.

This makes a seemingly unfair balance of power. (Though I could defend why China does it, and that reason is because US firms have definitely exploited smaller economies over the years. China has now largely avoided that fate. But this isn’t a politics website, I’m merely trying to explain why China is doing what they do.)

Where do we go from here? It’s unclear. Both presidential candidates seem concerned about China, so presumably restrictive measures could remain in place, with a Biden administration administering them a little more fairly/objectively. Long term, this could really hurt global business strategies with prominent Chinese ties.

That’s Disney, primarily, but really all the studios. One of the changes to my film model I’ve been thinking of making is to update the box office to: US, China and Rest of World. Since China is so protective, it keeps an outsized amount of profits in that country. (Only 25 cents of every box office dollar goes back to the studios. And even those can be hard to pull out.) If companies need to increasingly make “non-China included” strategic plans, that has lower global upside everywhere.

Entertainment Strategy Guy Update – The MLB-Turner Extend Their Deal with a 7% Year-Over-Year Increase

What? 7%? You saw the 65% jump in value reported in the press, didn’t you? 

Well, the key is context and the Entertainment Strategy Guy is nothing but context. When I see big splashy deals, my first question is the time period. In this case, a seven year extension. Then I take the two numbers and plot the CAGR. I put the average deal value in the middle of the deal (since leagues like to have revenue increase on a flat rate). Then I make my chart:

Screen Shot 2020-09-25 at 9.30.17 AM

As for the strategy, the next deal that shows a decrease in prices will be the first deal to show a decrease. Sports continue to be the source of programming keeping the linear channels alive, and the remaining linear players are paying a lot for them. And the bubble with 5-10% average increases in price each year has stayed on track.

Data of the Week – A Few Data Points on Subscribers (Peacock, NY Times The Daily and Shudder)

If “apples-to-apples” is the theme of the week, then I need to put the context right up front for these numbers. One of the numbers is “US only”. One is “US plus”. And two are global. Do not confuse them, since it really does change the denominator. (330 million versus 7 billion!)

First, Peacock, while explaining the increasing centralization of all NBC-Universal decisions under Peacock, Comcast let slip to the Wall Street Journal that they have gotten up to “15 million sign-ups” from the 10 million they announced in their July earnings report.

Next, Shudder, which is available in the United States, UK and some other territories, has reached the 1 million subscriber milestone.

Third, the New York Times “The Daily” podcast now reaches 4 million folks. Which is a huge number, but again don’t assume they’re all Americans.

The Athletic has also purportedly reached 1 million subscribers. While this is technically a global number, odds are it is driven much more by US customers. The caveat is that The Athletic has so aggressively discounted its business model that we don’t know what a subscriber’s actual ARPU is.

Other Contenders for Most Important Story

Disneyland (and Friends in California) Wants to Reopen

If you’ve been reading the EntStrategyGuy for any length of time, you’ll know that theme parks are a big part of Disney’s revenue stream. (Even more so than toys, which often get the credit.)

Hence, each week and month that Covid-19 keeps theme parks shuttered in California is a significant hit do Disney’s top and bottom lines. This week Disneyland, Knott’s Berry Farm and others publicly called on Governor Gavin Newsom to allow them to reopen. They noted that the reopenings in Florida and Europe haven’t seen accompanying surges in transmission, which surprised me. (Disneyland Hong Kong, however, was shut after reopening for having an outbreak.) 

Notably, some theme park-adjacent businesses are opening, like the Los Angeles Zoo. So curious to see when Newsom changes on this. 

DC Comics/DC Universe Staff Sees Layoffs

This is a few weeks old, but it is important enough news that I didn’t want to skip it. Warner Media is cutting staff at DC. If comic books can be the “R&D” department of a movie studio–and look at Disney, they are–then why would you cut the staff?

Of course, layoffs are complicated. Sometimes organizations really do have bloat. Sometimes they really do have redundant capabilities. But this seems like some creative executives were swept up in this part of the Warner Media reorganization. Meaning long term the cost cutting now could hurt the creative output of the future. Comic books will never be the cash cow that turns around AT&T’s fortunes, but having a strong DC could help grow HBO Max.

M&A Updates – Ion Networks is Acquired by EW Scripps

Some more merger action! This time Ion Networks is getting acquired by EW Scripps. I’ve long appreciated Ion Network’s business model. Ion Networks realized that if they owned a broadcast channel, cable and satellite providers must carry their programming. They bought up broadcast stations, and then ran cheap reruns. It’s been surprisingly successful for them:

image-1-estimates

Lots of News with No News – The Emmys!!!

I put less emphasis on The Emmy’s than anyone else. From a business perspective, I just don’t think they tell us much about what customers want or how businesses are doing. (They mostly tell you who spends the most on Emmy campaigning, as brutal as that sounds.)

The story was Schitt’s Creek, which went from nothing to something with a run on Netflix. Using the “Netflix is a Broadcast Channel” thinking, though, this makes sense. It’s like a show went from a small cable channel to running on NBC. Since it was good, naturally it had a boom in viewers.