Visual of the Week – Netflix Produces 3.3% of Its Top Streaming Shows

Over the last six weeks, Nielsen has released a top ten list of the most streamed series/films by total minutes viewed. I’ve been taking this data and adding a layer of detail on top, specifically who produces and who distributes what shows on Netflix, Amazon and so on. Now that we have six weeks of data, we can start to parse some insights. 

(Thanks to Kasey Moore of Whats-On-Netflix for saving the Nielsen lists for me.)

The visual of the week for this week is just a look at who owns what in the streaming wars. Of the 52 billion minutes of TV tracked by Nielsen, here’s who produced what and what shows they own (by parent company):

Screen Shot 2020-10-14 at 8.48.12 AM

And here is the table if you want to see how the sausage is made.

Screen Shot 2020-10-14 at 8.48.19 AM

Now some insights/details.

— Some shows were co-productions, in which case I split ownership between the two companies. Meaning, the percentages won’t add up to 100%, since some shows were counted in both owners’ percentages.
— Two films/series were not on Netflix (The Boys and Mulan), but that only boosts Netflix to 3.3% in “Netflix-only” series.
— I focused on major producers only. The traditional conglomerates. Usually, any of these shows has a bunch of smaller producers attached; I counted who likely paid the production budget.
— I use Wikipedia to determine producers with another source who tracks everything on Netflix by copyright ownership. The closest call was Umbrella Academy, which is also co-distributed by Netflix. However, NBC Universal owns the copyright outright so Netflix will not own it in perpetuity. Moreover, they aren’t listed as a producer, so didn’t make this list.
— That’s really what I’m trying to get at by focusing on producers versus distributors. The idea that who “owns” a piece of content so they can eventually maximize the value of it.
— I can hear the criticism, “Well this list is mostly library content.” And that’s true, but not 100% correct. Even the list of first and second run content by Netflix is almost entirely licensed content.
Seriously, don’t use “Netflix Originals” as a descriptor. It really doesn’t capture the key parts of ownership in content.
— I will run this same analysis on the FlixPatrol data for Netflix’s Top Ten list, but I haven’t had time to do that yet.

Bottom Line: A core thesis of Netflix’s content spend has been to build a “moat” of original content they own in perpetuity. Clearly they have a ways to go before they truly own their content.

  1. […] 3% of Netflix’s most-watched content over the last six weeks was actually produced by Netflix, according to an analysis of Nielsen data by The Entertainment Strategy Guy, a website that tracks […]

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  2. […] 3% of Netflix’s most-watched content over the last six weeks was actually produced by Netflix, according to an analysis of Nielsen data by The Entertainment Strategy Guy, a website that tracks […]

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  3. Is it possible to see this information by app it was viewed through? I’d like to understand what is ad supported and what isn’t.

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  4. […] of minutes viewed in streaming according to the Entertainment Strategy Guide: 1) NBCUniversal – 24% 2) WarnerMedia – 20% 3) ViacomCBS – 19% […]

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  5. […] The goal was to build a library/moat to sustain their subscriber advantage. (The challenge is how much of that content they own, even now.) If they are now pivoting to a “make money” phase, how does that impacts their stock […]

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